#41 The Barefoot Shepherd: St. Heribert – A Medieval Crisis Manager of the 11th Century fights Famines and Founder of Deutz Abbey

Heribert was around the year 1000 AD at the pinnacle of power as Chancellor of the Holy Roman Empire – but then he was suddenly deposed: but this was a stroke of luck for Cologne.

Heribert is also one of the most important medieval archbishops in the history of Cologne and here you can find out why this 11th century imperial prince is so significant for Cologne’s development.

On Christmas 999, a barefoot man enters Cologne on the Rhine. This sign of humility is probably rehearsed but sometimes also meant in the same way. The man’s name is Archbishop Heribert and he would set important impulses for Cologne’s urban development.

#41 The Barefoot Shepherd: St. Heribert – A Medieval Crisis Manager of the 11th Century and Founder of Deutz Abbey The History of Cologne

Heribert is also one of the most important medieval archbishops in the history of Cologne and here you can find out why this 11th century imperial prince is so significant for Cologne's development

Heribert

Archbishop Heribert sitting in the middle. Heribert is pictured here in the center. Above him, Jesus Christ is enthroned. Next to him are the personifications of “Caritas” (charity) and “Humilitas” (humility). Both attributes with which Heribert was already associated during his lifetime.

The shrine was made around 1170/75 and has housed Heribert’s mortal remains ever since. It is a masterpiece of late Romanesque art.

The new monastery: Deutz Abbey

Deutz Abbey on the city view made by Anton Wonnesam in 1531.

Detail of the city view by Anton Woensam looking over from Deutz across the Rhine to Cologne.

Contemporary depiction of the destruction of Deutz and the monastery church (where it makes boom in the picture) in 1632. Made by Matthäus Merian in 1633.

Where once the mighty abbey church stood that got destroyed several time through the course of history, now stands this baroque former parish church. Nowadays it serves the greek-orthodox community of Cologne as place of worship.

The abbey building got destroyed in WW2. Only the first floor remained. But the building has been rebuilt historically correct as possible.

The wreath of Saints and the cross of churches around the city

historyofcolognepodcast

The protective ring of saints around Cologne at the end of the Early Middle Ages. ⚠️Please be aware that I am not a graphic designer. But I wanted to illustrate this topic somehow graphically for you. Keep in mind that I have not drawn in all the churches of Cologne. Of course, St. Andrew or St. Mary in the Capitol, among others, would also be important for the cross or the protective wreath, which was supposed to protect Cologne next to the city wall itself.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s